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Jeff Beck :: Truth

Jeff Beck Truth SACD Audio Fidelity
NEW RELEASE
Jeff Beck
Truth
SKU: AFZ 269
Genre: 
Price: $29.99

TRACKS
1 Shapes Of Things     
2 Let Me Love You     
3 Morning Dew     
4 You Shook Me     
5 Ol' Man River     
6 Greensleeves     
7 Rock My Plimsoul     
8 Beck's Bolero     
9 Blues De Luxe     
10 I Ain't Superstitious

Produced by Mickie Most
Engineer: Ken Scott

Mastered by Steve Hoffman at Marsh Mastering
SACD Authoring: Stephen Marsh at Marsh Mastering

JEFF BECK <> <> <> <> TRUTH
"...a triumph of great tunes being masterfully performed."

 

Jeff Beck's debut solo LP was bound to be a great record with a band featuring talent like Rod Stewart on vocals, Ronnie Wood on guitar plus contributions from Jimmy Page, Nicky Hopkins, Aynsley Dunbar and Keith Moon. The 1968 album got off to a staggering start and peaked at number 15 on the Billboard 200. Astoundingly good for a band that had been utterly unknown in the U.S. just six months earlier

Truth was critically acclaimed for its daring, radical nature, elements of which would be appropriated by practically every metal band that followed. The recording is certainly regarded as a seminal work of heavy metal because of its use of blues toward a hard rock approach.

The combination of the wailing, heart-stoppingly dramatic vocalizing by Stewart, the thunderous rhythm section of Ron Wood's bass, Mickey Waller's drums, and Beck's blistering lead guitar, which sounds like his amp is turned up to 13 and ready to short out, was as groundbreaking and influential a record as the first Beatles, Rolling Stones, or Who albums.

There are lots of unexpected moments on this record: It opens with an oldie done in a new way - a cover of The Yardbirds 1966 hit "Shapes Of Things". Then their brilliant blues-rock cover of Howlin' Wolf's "You Shook Me"; Beck's speaker-to-speaker guitar slides and Rod's vocals are truly awesome and worth the price of admission on a version of Jerome Kern's "Ol' Man River" done as a slow electric blues; a brief plunge into folk territory with a solo acoustic guitar version of "Greensleeves"; the progressive blues of "Beck's Bolero"; the extended live "Blues Deluxe"; and "I Ain't Superstitious," a blazing reworking of another Willie Dixon song closes the album.